A Time For Everything – Developing Corporate Maturity

By Andrew Grant

TIME TO REFLECT

Looking back in many ways, the first few years of this millennium could be described as the perfect storm. After a build up of international tension over the last few years, SARS, war and a string of terrorist bombs around the world added to the conspiracy to change the way we view the world. We no longer take for granted the ways we travel and conduct business.

Some have become overwhelmed by a sense of desperation, but for others it has helped them gain a more mature view of the world.

TIME TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP

All people go through stages of development. Although most people are aware of how we develop physically, how many of us appreciate the other ways in which we need to mature as humans?

Psychologist Jean Piaget showed us how people develop their mental skills, Eriksson’s research demonstrated the emotional stages of transition from birth to death, and Fowler helped us understand the ways our beliefs develop over time. As we mature through these stages we are better equipped to deal with the ambiguities of life

HOW MATURE ARE YOU? TRY THIS QUICK QUIZ ...

Four stages of Christmas ...

1) I believe in Santa Claus

2) I don't believe in Santa Claus

3) I am Santa Claus

4) I look like Santa Claus!

 

TIME TO MOVE ON

The only way we will be able to continue to face the future with a positive outlook is by learning from each new experience and recognising it as a maturing and growing process.

There will be many more crises in the years ahead, that has become blatantly obvious, so the faster we can learn to adapt and move on the better.

Once we become conscious of the new realities of life, we must then become competent in dealing with them, until finally we are capable of internalizing the new skills acquired and acting in an ‘unconsiously competent’ way.

HOW MATURE ARE YOU? TRY THIS QUICK QUIZ …

Four stages of dealing with a crisis …

1) Unconscious and incompetent

2) Conscious and incompetent

3) Conscious and competent

4) Unconscious and competent

 

IS IGNORANCE BLISS?

In one survey, 95% of people questioned felt that ‘issues’ in their companies were handled in a reactive and ad hoc manner, often to the detriment of reputation and financial performance goals. Research has shown that effective use of issues management techniques and awareness can:

  1. Increase market share
  2. Enhance corporate reputation
  3. Save money
  4. Build important relationships

The earlier a relevant issue can be identified and managed in terms of a systematic organisational response, the more likely it is that it the organisation can resolve conflict and minimalise cost implications to its advantage.

THE IMPORTANT AND THE URGENT

Companies must learn to determine the urgency of the issues and need to realize that as the issue turns into a crisis if not dealt with adequately, management’s attention evaporates in favour of more immediate and pressing matters. Urgent matters take precedence over important long term needs.

The longer an issue survives the fewer choices are available and the more it costs. Early action allows for flexible and creative thinking.

RISKING REPUTATION

The top 250 companies in the UK have claimed that damage to reputation is the biggest business risks they face. Good will is believed to account for 71% of total market capital.

One would hope that a year like we have had would fast track individuals and organisations to maturity, but the research shows that most people actually learn very little from past experiences and are often doomed to repeat them. How mature is your organisation in coming to terms with the world that we live in?

© Andrew Grant

 

T-Thoughts articles may be reproduced with written permission and must also be acknowledged with a web link back to the Tirian pages.

 

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